Employee Engagement Tips

If you’ve found this page, you have probably enjoyed reading, The Only Leadership Book You’ll Ever Need. The book highlights ten tips to help you go more indepth on a variety of topics:

1.  The Power of a Positive Vision

“This ‘vision thing’ is highly overrated,” announced Kevin, a participant in one of our recent leadership seminars. After further discussion, Kevin conceded that there may be some value in executives creating a vision for the organization, but insisted that there is little value in managers or supervisors creating a “personal leadership vision.”  Read more. . . 

Click Here for a one-week series of exercises to help you create your own personal leadership vision.

2.  Motivate Your Team Without Money

Five Ideas To Help Motivate Your Staff That Will Not Cost You A Dime

3.  Improve Your Listening Skills

Unfortunately, few managers know how to be good listeners, and managers who are poor listeners miss numerous opportunities to learn more about their team members’ needs and goals. Statistics indicate that the untrained listener is likely to understand and retain only about 50 percent of a conversation. This relatively poor retention rate drops to an even less impressive 25 percent just 48 hours later.  This means that an untrained listener’s recall of particular conversations will usually be inaccurate and incomplete.  Read more. . .

4.  Building Your Confidence

Here are twenty of the things we feel are most important for managers to build their confidence. Do not be concerned with trying all twenty at the same time. We recommend that you write each of these points on an individual 3 x 5 card and work on only one or two points each week. After you have concentrated on each point for a period of four to six weeks, that specific point will begin to become a part of your life. In other words, you will have replaced self-defeating habits of your past with these good habits. The result is a higher degree of confidence that will permeate and penetrate your entire life. Read more. . .

5.  Coaching a Difficult Employee

Take immediate action. The longer you wait to confront a negative behavior, the harder it will be to change. It does not take long before the inappropriate behavior becomes a habit and habits are very hard to break. Once you have determined that a negative pattern of behavior exists, take action.  Read more. . .

6.  Navigating the Sea of Change

In today’s turbulent economic environment, business leaders are asking, “What can I do to prepare my organization for the changes ahead?” To meet the changing demands of customers and outside forces, great leaders know they need to change the way they do business. They also know their success depends on their ability to engage their entire workforce in the change process.  Read more. . .

7.  Powerful Performance Reviews

Create a Positive Climate:  To help the employee relax, it is a good idea to begin the interview with a couple of minutes of light, easy conversation.  Perhaps start with a comment about a recent event at work, a sporting event, or something in the news.  Beginning this way helps build rapport with the employee and may help the employee overcome his/her initial nervousness.    As stated previously, sitting at a round table, or side by side, further equalizes the situation and enhances rapport with the employee.  Read more. . .

8.  Handling Conflict Postively

One of the challenges of dealing with conflict is to help people maintain healthy relationships during and after periods of conflict.  Simply resolving the problem is not enough.  The people involved must be satisfied with the outcome and attention must be given to their emotional well-being.  If these two areas are not addressed, chances are other problems will surface within time.  The following tips will help you maintain healthy relationships during periods of conflict.  Read more. . .

9.  Think Like a Dolphin

In the Strategy of the Dolphin, Dudley Lynch and Paul Kordis chose the dolphin to illustrate the ideal manager because of its high intelligence and ability to learn from experience. When dolphins do not get what they want, they quickly and purposefully change their behaviors in pursuit of their goal. For example, dolphins confronted by a shark have the reputation of repeatedly circling the shark and ramming its rib cage, using their bulbous noses as bludgeons. Eventually the shark takes off or sinks helplessly.  Read more. . .

10.  Benefits of an Employee Opinion Survey

In our twenty years of conducting surveys, we continued to be impressed by the benefits both individual leaders and organizations realize when they ask for their employees’ opinions and take action based on the feedback they receive from employees.  While the list of benefits is extensive, based on feedback from our clients, these ten benefits are at the top of our list.  Read more. . . 

 

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